Smelly Drains?

Smelly Drain Pipes

Smelly Drain Pipes

So many times we smell an odd or unpleasant odor in our kitchen or bathrooms and don’t really know why.  What’s worse is that this inadvertently seems to always happen when you have company visiting.  If this happens, don’t worry – we’ve got you covered.  There are many reasons why your drain pipes smell or are remitting an odor but here are the 5 most common reasons for smelly drains:

  1. Dried p-trap: The p-trap is the curved pipe segment underneath most sinks. The point of this curve is to trap water, which prevents sewer gas from flowing back up the pipe. But if the sink isn’t used often, the water will evaporate, and the sewer gas will have an easy way into your home. This is the easiest of the problems to fix, since all you have to do is run water down the drain for about a minute to restore the water barrier.
  2. Blocked drain vents: Your drainage system has vents to allow sewer gas to escape through pipes that lead to the roof. This keeps pressure from building up in the pipes. But if those vents become blocked, the pressure will force the sewer gas up through the p-traps and into your home. Professional plumbers will need to look into the vents and find what repairs need to be done.
  3. Rotten organic material: This is an issue with kitchen sinks. If too much organic material builds ups along the drainpipe walls, it can start to decay and give off a foul stench. Plumbers can use special drain cleaning tools to fix this.
  4. Damaged sewer line: This is the most serious problem, since it can lead to sewage backing up into your home. If you notice bad smells from drains all over the house, plus numerous clogs, don’t wait to call for help! You’ll need our expertise to repair or replace the sewer line.
  5. Full Septic Tank: Now this option may not apply to everyone but some homes don’t have public server system and use septic tanks.  Home owners who have septic tanks must treat their septic tanks every month, in order to keep their septic system  running efficiently.  Household septic tanks are typically pumped every three to five years. Alternative systems with electrical float switches, pumps, or mechanical components should be inspected more often, generally once a year.